775 Park Avenue

UPPER EAST SIDE | East 72nd Street and East 73rd Street

 

Description

No description available at this time.
Building Specifics
Units: 47
Ownership: Coop
Stories: 14
Building Year: 1927
Green Building: No
Pets: Pets OK
New Development: No
Health Club
Storage
 

About UPPER EAST SIDE

Upper East Side Neighborhood in NYC: UPPER EAST SIDE

The Upper East Side of Manhattan is located between Central Park and the East River from 49th Street to 96th Street. Renown in popular culture, the setting serves as inspiration for countless works from the classic, coming of age story The Catcher in the Rye to the fashion-forward Gossip Girl show featuring Blake Lively.

The designated Upper East Side Historic District extends from 49th Street to 79th Street and from Fifth Avenue to Lexington Avenue. Before the development of the area as we know it today, the city government owned what used to be a rural piece of land from 1686 to 1785. Development of the neighborhood began after the American Revolutionary War.

Fifth Avenue was laid out in 1785, then Park Avenue and Sixth Avenue in 1796. Lots were gradually sold or leased, and land speculation began on the area. As public transportation routes extended and construction began on Central Park in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the Upper East Side became a destination for New York society.

First, fashionable New Yorkers like Caroline Schermerhorn Astor moved into gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion homes from the 1880s to early 1900s. They also built several stables and carriage houses, now converted into modern homes, as well as buildings for elite social clubs like the Metropolitan Club at 1 East 60th Street.

After World War I, luxury apartment living became fashionable and many grand apartment houses replaced the mansions. However, brownstones were still popular in the neighborhood and Madison Avenue quickly established itself as a commercial street. The first two floors of buildings often housed businesses, while the upper floors housed families. More apartment houses were built after World War II. Today, the historic district is a combination of architectural gems spanning from the late 1800s to the first half of the 20th century.

The Upper East Side is the site of some of the best the Big Apple has to offer from awe-inspiring art collections along Museum Mile and the best restaurants in New York City, to highly ranked schools and hospitals.

Upper East Side Neighborhood in NYC: UPPER EAST SIDE

The Upper East Side of Manhattan is located between Central Park and the East River from 49th Street to 96th Street. Renown in popular culture, the setting serves as inspiration for countless works from the classic, coming of age story The Catcher in the Rye to the fashion-forward Gossip Girl show featuring Blake Lively.

The designated Upper East Side Historic District extends from 49th Street to 79th Street and from Fifth Avenue to Lexington Avenue. Before the development of the area as we know it today, the city government owned what used to be a rural piece of land from 1686 to 1785. Development of the neighborhood began after the American Revolutionary War.

Fifth Avenue was laid out in 1785, then Park Avenue and Sixth Avenue in 1796. Lots were gradually sold or leased, and land speculation began on the area. As public transportation routes extended and construction began on Central Park in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the Upper East Side became a destination for New York society.

First, fashionable New Yorkers like Caroline Schermerhorn Astor moved into gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion homes from the 1880s to early 1900s. They also built several stables and carriage houses, now converted into modern homes, as well as buildings for elite social clubs like the Metropolitan Club at 1 East 60th Street.

After World War I, luxury apartment living became fashionable and many grand apartment houses replaced the mansions. However, brownstones were still popular in the neighborhood and Madison Avenue quickly established itself as a commercial street. The first two floors of buildings often housed businesses, while the upper floors housed families. More apartment houses were built after World War II. Today, the historic district is a combination of architectural gems spanning from the late 1800s to the first half of the 20th century.

The Upper East Side is the site of some of the best the Big Apple has to offer from awe-inspiring art collections along Museum Mile and the best restaurants in New York City, to highly ranked schools and hospitals.

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Upper East Side Neighborhood in NYC: UPPER EAST SIDE

The Upper East Side of Manhattan is located between Central Park and the East River from 49th Street to 96th Street. Renown in popular culture, the setting serves as inspiration for countless works from the classic, coming of age story The Catcher in the Rye to the fashion-forward Gossip Girl show featuring Blake Lively.

The designated Upper East Side Historic District extends from 49th Street to 79th Street and from Fifth Avenue to Lexington Avenue. Before the development of the area as we know it today, the city government owned what used to be a rural piece of land from 1686 to 1785. Development of the neighborhood began after the American Revolutionary War.

Fifth Avenue was laid out in 1785, then Park Avenue and Sixth Avenue in 1796. Lots were gradually sold or leased, and land speculation began on the area. As public transportation routes extended and construction began on Central Park in the latter half of the nineteenth century, the Upper East Side became a destination for New York society.

First, fashionable New Yorkers like Caroline Schermerhorn Astor moved into gargantuan Fifth Avenue mansion homes from the 1880s to early 1900s. They also built several stables and carriage houses, now converted into modern homes, as well as buildings for elite social clubs like the Metropolitan Club at 1 East 60th Street.

After World War I, luxury apartment living became fashionable and many grand apartment houses replaced the mansions. However, brownstones were still popular in the neighborhood and Madison Avenue quickly established itself as a commercial street. The first two floors of buildings often housed businesses, while the upper floors housed families. More apartment houses were built after World War II. Today, the historic district is a combination of architectural gems spanning from the late 1800s to the first half of the 20th century.

The Upper East Side is the site of some of the best the Big Apple has to offer from awe-inspiring art collections along Museum Mile and the best restaurants in New York City, to highly ranked schools and hospitals.

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